Questions

This page will discuss commonly asked questions about Covid-19 and vaccines.

General Covid-19 Information?

According to CDC, COVID-19 is a respiratory disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, a new coronavirus discovered in 2019.

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According to CDC, the virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

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According to CDC, adults 65 years and older and people of any age with underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness.
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According to CDC, some people who are infected may not have symptoms. For people who have symptoms, illness can range from mild to severe.

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General COVID-19 Vaccine Information

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According to new guidance from the CDC, fully vaccinated people can now participate in all indoor and outdoor activities without a mask and without physical distancing. For people who are not fully vaccinated, the CDC continues to recommend mask wearing and other preventive measures in some outdoor settings and in most indoor settings.

If you feel more comfortable wearing a mask even when you are vaccinated, feel free to continue to do so.

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The CDC has not yet provided evidence in support of a booster shot.

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General Vaccine Hesitancy Questions

The vaccine itself is safe for neurodivergent populations. However, anxiety and worries about getting vaccinated may trigger a stress reaction. Check out some of our blog posts to see how you can prepare to have a smooth and positive vaccination experience (coming soon).

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There is no COVID-19 vaccine that includes microchipping, nor are there currently any plans to produce one.

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No. Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals such as iron, nickel, cobalt, lithium, and rare earth alloys, as well as any manufactured products such as microelectronics, electrodes, carbon nanotubes, and nanowire semiconductors. In addition, the typical dose for a COVID-19 vaccine is less than a milliliter, which is not enough to allow magnets to be attracted to your vaccination site even if the vaccine was filled with a magnetic metal.

more info: CDC

It is one’s personal choice to get vaccinated or not. However, if your family member is just hesitant in getting the vaccine, be patient, acknowledge that their concerns are legitimate and offer your help in getting them the answers that they need to help them feel comfortable getting vaccinated.

Helpful Guide

Related Blog Post

  • Vaccination promotes community immunity. Community immunity protects everyone. But it’s especially important because some people can’t get vaccinated for certain diseases — such as people with some serious allergies and those with weakened or failing immune systems (like people who have cancer, HIV/AIDS, type 1 diabetes, or other health conditions).
  • Community immunity also protects the very small group of people who don’t have a strong immune response from vaccines.

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No:

  • Fully vaccinated people can resume activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance.
  • If you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did before the pandemic. However, some places such as health care facilities, airports, and public transit facilities are may still require wearing a mask.

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There is no evidence to suggest COVID-19 mRNA vaccines cause neurocognitive issues, a general term that means a person is experiencing decreased mental function due to a disease other than psychiatric illness.

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  • The federal government is providing vaccines free of charge to all people living in the United States, regardless of their immigration or health insurance status. Ensuring that everyone in the United States can receive a COVID-19 vaccine helps us get closer to the goal of achieving population immunity. These are the same vaccines that are being distributed in other parts of the world.
  • COVID-19 Vaccines Are Free to the Public | CDC